Kenyatta National Hospital Doctors Successfully Seperate Conjoined Twins

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A team of sixty specialist doctors at Kenyatta National Hospital successfully separate conjoined twins.

The 23-hour operation from Tuesday 6am to Wednesday 5am made history as the first of its kind in Kenya and sub-Saharan Africa.

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The conjoined twins, born at a Meru hospital, were joined at the sacral region of the lower spine.

They were admitted at the referral hospital a day after birth, just over two years ago and have since been in the facility as surgery planning went on.

Head of pediatric surgery Fred Kabuni said the main aim of the procedure was to separate the babies at the juncture and to create stomachs for them.

Kabuni said the two-year wait to perform the surgery was to allow key organs to develop and let muscle get strong enough for surgery.

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He also added that they will undergo four more reconstructive surgeries after their wounds heal. They would include skin, genitalia, anal canal and bowel reconstruction.

He expressed his excitement for the team, which included pediatric surgeons, neurosurgeons, plastic and reconstructive surgeons, anesthetists and nurses that participated in the long but successful journey.

The mother of the babies, Caroline Mukiri, spoke to news reporters after seeing her baby girls for the first time after separation.

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”At least I can now smile, I thank God and also the team that was in the theater and assured me that God was in control.

”I relaxed when I saw that they all had great faith in God and when the surgery ended and my girls were separated, I was very happy. Now I am so excited because they have been taken out of the life support machine and are breathing on their own.”

The babies are currently in the Intensive Care Unit under observation and are expected to make full recovery.