Meet The World’s Tallest Teenager Who Cant Stop Growing

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The world’s tallest teenager stands at a height of 7ft 8ins and is on course to be the world’s tallest man.

Broc Brown, from Michigan, United States grows at the rate of six inches a year. He would easily surpass the current world’s tallest man, Sultan Kosen, who measures 8ft 2ins.

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World's Tallest Teenager

The 19-year-old’s incredible growth is as a result of a genetic disorder known as Sotos Syndrome or cerebral gigantism. He was diagnosed with the disorder at the age of five.

His mother said her son measured 5ft 2ins when he was in kindergarten.

World's Tallest Teenager

”When he got into middle school he was around 6ft tall and by high school he was 7ft tall – he could easily grow six inches in a year.”

“It’s a genetic disorder and there’s nothing that can stop him from growing – I don’t know if he will ever stop.”

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Doctors previously warned his mother that Broc might not live past his teenage years. The doctors are however now confident Broc will live a normal life despite his other health problems.

Broc was born with one kidney, suffers from learning difficulties, strain on his heart, curvature of the spine and narrowing of the spinal cord.

He has severe back pains and can’t take painkillers because he has one kidney. Experts conclude that the pain is something Broc would have to live with.

Broc said:

“It kind of feels like a big tennis racket has gone through my back.”

“I do stuff to stop it hurting and it makes me feel like there’s a needle gone through it – it’s hard to deal with.”

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Broc’s clothes, shoes, bed are specially made. Socks to cover his size 28 feet cost $18 a pair. He also needs a specialist chair to sit on for his back.

Broc’s condition is said to affect one in every 15,000 people.